Yes, statistical errors are slowing down scientific progress!

Over at dynamic ecology,  Jeremy Fox argues that Technical statistical mistakes are overrated; ecologists (especially students) worry too much about them. Individually and collectively, technical statistical mistakes hardly ever appreciably slow the progress of entire subfields or sub-subfields. And fixing them rarely meaningfully accelerates progress. continuing with Don’t agree? Try this exercise: name the most…

What’s wrong with null models?

A guest post by Carsten F. Dormann Over the last years, I have been using null models more often than I liked. I had to, when there was no other way to figure out if an ecological pattern was unexpected, or trivial. Inspired by some recent (and also some older) posts, I thought I might throw around…

Training school and workshop on calibration and validation of dynamic vegetation models in France

Two events I’m involved in that may be interesting for people that work on connecting process-based vegetation models to data. Both are organized through CA 1304 PROFOUND, and fully funded by COST: There will be a training school on Bayesian calibration, forecasting and multi-model predictions of process-based vegetation models in Rencurel / Grenoble, France, 12.-16.…

Back from Bayes IV

As announced a while ago, we had moved our now already traditional summer school in Bayesian Statistics to Bergen, Norway this year. Maybe fitting for such a course, the weather turned out to be very different from the long-term frequency, in what must be the upper 1% quantile of sun intensity for the region at…

Notes from France

I’ve just returned from two weeks in France, the first week on the International Statistical Ecology Conference 2014 in Montpellier, and the second at the Laboratoire d’Écologie Alpine (LECA) in Grenoble, visiting the groups of Wilfried Thuiller and Sébastien Lavergne, which was both great. Some impressions from the ISEC: First of all, my compliments to…

Webinaring Bayes

Yesterday, I gave my first webinar, or online lecture if you want. The occasion was that a few people from another university asked me if I could give an introductory lecture about Bayesian statistics, and because traveling would have cost me a full day, I suggested doing a “virtual visit” instead. It’s a funny coincidence…