Do you still know all your coauthors?

Collaboration sizes increase across all scientific disciplines, and Ecology is no exception to this trend. One of the problems emerging from this development is that it seems more and more difficult to remember all your coauthors. This recent erratum in Nature adds no less than five forgotten coauthors, in addition to correcting various names and…

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Reproducibility at Nature

In an editorial in tomorrow’s issue, Nature announces an initiative to increase reproducibility of research results. They state that “From next month, Nature and the Nature research journals will introduce editorial measures to address the problem by improving the consistency and quality of reporting in life-sciences articles”. The announced measures include To ease the interpretation…

Movement in the peer-review system

A news article in the upcoming edition of Nature highlights a new kid on the block in the battle for the publishing system of the future – it’s called Rubriq, a company that wants to “outsource” the review process from the normal publication process. Very similar to what Peerage of Science provides, but as a…

A world model for ecology?

This week’s edition of Nature featured a comment by Drew Purves and colleagues titled “Ecosystems: Time to model all life on Earth”, in which they propose that we need a new model type, general ecosystem models (GEM), that describe the interplay of all major organism types on earth. They say that GEMs […] could capture…

The data detective

Tomorrows issue of Nature has an interesting interview with Uri Simonsohn, a researcher that has been investigating several cases of data fabrication in psychology by requesting the raw data and looking for statistical anomalies. In the interview, he explains that The basic idea is to see if the data are too close to the theoretical…

Accelerated speciation in colour-polymorphic birds

There’s an interesting new study in tomorrow’s issue of nature. Andrew F. Hugall and Devi Stuart-Fox use molecular phylogenies to look at speciation rates of birds. I cite from the abstract: … we confirm, using species-level molecular phylogenies for five families of non-passerine birds, that colour polymorphism is associated with accelerated speciation rates in the…

Evidence of non-random mutation rates in Escherichia coli

A article in tomorrow’s edition of Nature caught my eye – Iñigo Martincorena and colleagues have sequenced a number of Escherichia coli genomes and compare the speed of genetic drift at different locations in the genome. They observe that the neutral mutation rate varies by more than an order of magnitude across 2,659 genes, with…

The Amazon basin in transition

In a review paper that appeared in this week’s edition of Nature, Davidson and colleagues describe the interactions and feedbacks between land use change, climate change, and a range of more local climatically mediated processes such as water balance, winds and pressure systems and fire in the Amazon basin. I found this a very nice…